The Inspiring Youth of the RYC

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BY HANNA JACKSON |

Don’t let anyone look down on you because you are young, but set an example for the believers in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith and in purity.

                                                                                                                        1 Timothy 4:12

This verse is so brilliantly reflected by the youth that I have had the privilege to work with while in the Interim RYC Coordinator position.

The Regional Youth Council (RYC) is a group of high school age youth from the different Moravian churches throughout the Southern Province. They meet monthly to plan events for the province, grow in their faith, and build friendships with other Moravians their age.

 

RYC Shirt graphic

The 2017 RYC shirt artwork

 

I was in RYC when I was in high school and have fond memories of my time as a representative. Being on RYC was the highlight of my high school career; I met my best friends through RYC, I was surrounded by other Moravians, and had a blast laughing at Brad Bennett and John G. Rights try to “out pun” one another. For me, RYC was more than just a monthly meeting, it was my life.

When I accepted the job offer as the Interim RYC Coordinator, I was really excited and hopeful about the summer for many reasons. I wanted to make sure the youth that are currently in RYC have as amazing memories as I did. After sitting down with the adult advisors of RYC, we discussed different ideas on what the youth might enjoy for this coming year. After leaving this meeting, I got to work to put these ideas in place. I have spent time coordinating the time, place, and activities of this coming year’s events. I have also worked on compiling a list of all the RYC reps from the different churches. Every year, with seniors graduating and new freshmen rising, we have a new set of youth involved in the group. This brings me to my favorite part of the job: the youth!!!

 

2010 RYC

The 2010 RYC

 

Since RYC doesn’t meet in the summer, I haven’t had a lot of time to spend with the current reps, but I was lucky enough to tag along with Doug to the last few events of the 2016-2017 school year. These kids are amazing!! Watching them interact with each other, as well as the adult advisors is inspiring. There is such hope and joy in their conversations. Asking the youth about their plans in life, where they wanted to go to college… what they wanted to do to was uplifting and encouraging. Seeing this really encouraged me to plan this next school year.

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

                                                                                                                        Philippians 4:6-7

As many of these youths move on to college or explore their career choices, and even the ones still in high school, I hope they remember their time spent in RYC. Remember the lessons, laughter, friendship and fellowship. They are ready to take on the world, and God has great plans for them.

 

The 2017 RYC

The 2017 RYC

 


Questions? Comments? Contact Amy Linville at Hanna@MoravianBCM.org or call (336) 722-8126 Ext. 403

Hanna Jackson

 

Hanna Jackson is the Interim RYC Coordinator for the Moravian Board of Cooperative Ministries (BCM). She attends Calvary Moravian Church in Winston Salem. In her free time, she enjoys running, hiking, baking, and crafting.

Was That Said in Love?

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BY AMY LINVILLE |

“Was that said in love?” I ask in an attempt to bring a sense of lightheartedness to the situation and cease a quarrel between two campers. I know it’s cheesy, but you can only ask them to stop and behave so many times, and it’s a long week. Most of the time, it serves only to bring laughter. But in reality, I hope that this phrase occasionally slips into the mind of the campers as they prepare for bed, reflect during small group, or play “knock-out” on the slab. And the more I hope it for the kids at camp, the more I hope this thought slips into the minds of friends, family, and myself at home.

magnifying glass

I like words. I like to analyze words, study the history of words, search for context of words, and ponder for hours over word choice. I know that most people might not spend as much energy on these pursuits as I do, but I receive a great deal of fulfillment in trying to understand from where our words come. Our words and actions are rooted in our thoughts and emotions. Each piece gives away how we think, process, and feel. The things we say and do offer glimpses into our physical, spiritual, and mental states. My husband knows that many of my words said in anger can originate in hunger (hanger is dangerous and not to be taken lightly). I know that a young camper’s tears and pleading phrases can often come from a place of fear; being away from home for the first time is scary. Perhaps those we see spreading hateful words are really confused, afraid, and maybe a little hangry. Many days, it takes effort and pause for me to ensure that my words are coming from a place of love. I have to be mindful about it.

So, what does it mean to speak, and even act, from a place of love? We all know that “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” (1 Corinthians, 4-7. NIV). This passage from the Bible is probably one of the most quoted, but I know it is not enacted nearly as frequently. To come from a place of love would require patience and a yearning to understand and listen. It would necessitate us to put aside the vanities to which we cling not out of false humility or even a sense of obligation, but from a true desire to care for our whole communities. If the things we said and did were rooted love, would we give up on others? Would we give up on ourselves?

heart tree picture

At camp this past week, we discussed at length how we reflect God’s loves in our words and deeds: feeding the hungry, giving water to the thirsty, clothing the naked, welcoming the stranger, caring for the sick and imprisoned. I saw the campers reflect God’s love when they laughed with each other, cared for their bodies by going to bed when tired (my favorite thing for campers to do!), spoke kindly to each other, and respected God’s creation. I saw them trying each day to come to the world from a place of love. As the week went on, I asked fewer and fewer campers “Was that said in love?”. I heard, saw, and felt the love in their actions and words. I know it took effort for everyone to pause and work to find that place of love. It’s not easy, but Corinthians doesn’t tell us that love is easy. It tells us that love never fails. Words and actions in love, will never fail to bring us closer to God.

In today’s political, socioeconomic, church, and even weather climate (does this heat make anyone else grumpy?), it becomes ever more important to keep love at the forefront of our thoughts. As we prepare for our Southern Province Synod in less than a year, I hope we can let love guide us. We cannot always say and do the right things, but we can try each day to speak and act in love. Even on the days when we do not like others or ourselves, God has called us to love.


Questions? Comments? Contact Amy Linville at Amy@MoravianBCM.org or call (336) 722-8126 Ext. 404

Amy Linville

Amy Linville is the Interim College Age Ministry Coordinator for the Moravian BCM. She spends her time outside of work taking classes to become a librarian, serving Rural Hall Moravian with her husband the Rev. Aaron Linville, and snuggling her puppy and two cats.

A Hidden Treasure: the Resource Center

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BY JANE BUMGARNER | 

Resource Center books

I would like to tell churches with the Moravian Southern Province of a “hidden treasure” that is available to you and your church family.

This valuable treasure is our Resource Center, located at 500 South Church in Winston- Salem, near Home Moravian Church in Old Salem. The Board of Cooperative Ministries (BCM) offer this service to all Moravian churches in our Province, and our ecumenical partners as well.

The Center can provide congregations with a variety of curriculum for Vacation Bible School, Sunday school material for all ages, Bible studies or any special class you might be having. They have books and DVDs available for you to check out. Materials can be previewed online, for your convenience at Resource.Moravian.org. Beth Hayes, the materials coordinator of the Resource Center, is available to help you locate just the right material for your group.

Resource Center books

Our congregation, New Hope Moravian, located in Hickory, is a small, yet spirit-filled, active congregation. The Resource Center is such a blessing to us! We have at our fingertips the newest materials at no cost. This is a tremendous savings to our congregation in addition to providing us with up-to-date curriculum. We have also used the Resource Center as a resource to purchase additional hymnals, Bibles and Moravian Daily Texts.

Resource Center books

Check out the materials that are available to you at this hidden treasure. You may call the Resource Center at (336) 722-8126 or visit the Moravian Resource Center online at Resource.Moravian.org.

Jane Bumgarner
Worship Chairperson
New Hope Moravian Church in Hickory

Resource Center


If you have questions or need additional information, email BHayes@MCSP.org or call the Resource Center (336) 722-8126.

 

Do This… In Remembrance of Me

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BY DAVID HOLSTON |

Note: David Holston is the Executive Director of Sunnyside Ministry, a ministry partner of the Moravian Board of Cooperative Ministries (BCM). 

This past Sunday we celebrated communion in my congregation. It was in memory of the martyrdom of John Hus, the spiritual forefather of the Moravian Church. There, for a brief period, we all gathered at the table together. When we partook of the bread and the cup, the officiant says three times during the service: “Do this… in remembrance of me”.

Do this… in remembrance of me

This phrase resonated with me this past weekend as I thought about all I am through the grace of Jesus Christ. First, I remember that through the crucified Christ I am saved. This is a very important thing to remember. But as I thought more about this, I was led to the many lessons taught by Christ. I must say that I am often drawn to the passages about how we treat others. It is related to my daily life and my thinking.

Picture of communion

Take a few minutes and think about the last time you took communion. In the Moravian Church we practice an open communion; if you are a communing member of any church you are welcome at our table. What resonates with you when you take communion?

In the 1970’s there was a Coca-Cola commercial with all sorts of people gathered in lines singing “I’d like to teach the world to sing, in perfect harmony!” Imagine a world where we all held hands and sang songs and shared a Coca-Cola. Sadly, today it feels unlikely to happen. Someone would be offended by the person standing beside them; others would make fun of the one standing a few feet away. Some might even say, “this person is too sick to stand near me!” In reality, we know people are not always singing on mountain tops or in perfect harmony. Sadly, harmony does not exist in some cases between communing Christians. We can’t always agree to come to the same table. If we always did, there would be little to no hunger in this or any community.

Sunnyside Ministry

Sunnyside Ministry

In the last six days, we have had four people shot just a few blocks from two Moravian Churches and Sunnyside Ministry. At Sunnyside Ministry, the other day alone, we saw two females who have just escaped domestic violence. Additionally, Sunnyside has provided groceries for over a hundred families.

I believe that the change starts at this table, the one in most churches inscribed with the words: “Do this in remembrance of me.”

We ask “were does it end?” We say “someone needs to fix this!” We wonder “when are things going to get better?” I believe that the change starts at this table, the one in most churches inscribed with the words: “Do this in remembrance of me.” It starts with us, the Christian community when we reach out to everyone, both those who seem to have it all and those who we have called “the least, the lost, the last.”

Consider the original mission statement of the Salem Tavern:

“Whereas it is the duty of the Board of Directors of the Congregation to supervise, with a watchful eye, the tavern, and it is their ardent desire that the guests who come here (who are of very different dispositions and customs, yea, even occasionally enemies and spies) may be served by our Brothers and Sisters thus, by their correct conduct, without words, testify to Jesus’ death, and in their difficult office and calling, be an honor to the Lord and Congregation.”

Can we, create a table where all are welcomed, even our enemies? We can. Will it be easy? I think that it would be easier than we think, but only if we do this in remembrance of Christ.


Questions? Comments? Contact David Holston at David@SunnysideMinistry.org or call (336) 724-7558 ext. 103

David Holston

David Holston is the Executive Director of Sunnyside Ministry. Sunnyside Ministry is a non-profit organization that provides food, clothing, and emergency financial assistance to families in crisis. All funding for our assistance programs comes from donations and grants. In 2014, Sunnyside Ministry provided $1,883,040 worth of services to families in crisis situations. Grocery orders were provided to 17,634 people and clothing to 15,483 individuals. To learn more about Sunnyside Ministry, subscribe to their email newsletter here.